Wednesday, April 30, 2014

The Clock: National Poetry Month 30 of 30

The clock ticks
and I sit
fingers at the keyboard
fighting a poem
yet again.

The clock tocks
and I wish
it would tell me
what to write,
whisper words to me.

The clock's hands
move in circles;
my hands
wait patiently
for words to fill the page.

Minutes turn to hours
while I search for rhythms
to make lines sing.
Waiting on the moment
when poem and pen become one.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

Well, this poem explains about a third of my nights in April as I tried to get a poem posted by midnight.  

In March I wrote every day as part of the Slice of Life Challenge.  This month I have written 30 poems about objects.  It's been a bit of a challenge.  My hope had been to capture the stories behind the objects of our lives.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without," "school objects" and finally a little "playground poetry."

Of course, I wouldn't have survived the month without the inspiration of Mary Lee Hahn, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, Linda Baie, Carol Wilcox, Catherine, Kevin, Julianne, Leigh and other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  

Pink Rain: Chalk-a-bration

Today is the last day of April so it is the end of 30 days of poetry for #NationalPoetryMonth and it is time to celebrate with a Chalk-a-bration.  Today I join Betsy Hubbard in a little end of the month poetry celebration.  It has been snowing for months making it hard to participate.  My students and I were determined that despite the rain we would get outside for a chalk-a-bration celebration.  While on the playground, I couldn't help but notice this flowering tree waiting for a poem so I stopped to write a little poem inspired by the colorful blossoms.




Pink Rain

Pink blossoms
Rest on umbrella
Braches.
Waiting
On the perfect
Moment
To float down.
Raining pink
Onto the grass
of green.  

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Stuck Inside: National Poetry Month 29 of 30

The slide
the swings
the rings
all wait.

The rain
pours from the gray sky
not planning
to stop.

We watch
from the windows
stuck inside
again.

Wishing
it would stop
so we could
join them.

©  Cathy L. Mere 2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Tetherball: National Poetry Month 28 of 30

Tetherball

Back and forth,
the ball sways.
Swings.
Smack!

To and fro,
the players hit.
Push.
Pow!

Side to side,
the ball glides.
Soars.
Swoosh!

Around and around,
the chain wraps.
Game over.
Victory!

© Cathy L. Mere 2014


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.


Sunday, April 27, 2014

The Poem Isn't on the Playground: National Poetry Month 27 of 30

Today
I saw the crabapple,
with its pink blossoms
ready to burst.
Calling to me
just beyond the patio.

For years,
the piano,
its keys silent,
discovered the joy
of someone
able to help it sing.

The rain
pitter-pattered
near my window,
turning the grass
from brown to green.
The flowers rejoicing.

I just sat
trying to find poetry.
Trying to turn
the playground
into a poem to share.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

I spent today trying to find a poem about an object on the playground.  Is this the day for monkey bars?  For rings?  For soccer goals?  For tetherball?  As I tried to find the words, poetry seemed to be unfolding around me.  My commitment to the project made me want to stick with the topic, but the words were somewhere else.  So I wrote this.

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Saturday, April 26, 2014

Your Moment: National Poetry Month 26 of 30

Your Moment

The bounce
brings friends together.
The throw
asks others to join.
The kick
brings players running.
The catch
is your moment
to shine.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Slide: National Poetry Month 25 of 30

via WikiMedia Commons
photo by KRTaikoo
Slide

twisting,
    turning,
the slide
    slithers,
from sky
    to soil,
joyfully,
    children
       race
         from
              top
                 to
            bottom,
                 again
                     and
                      again!

©  Cathy L. Mere  2014



I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.



Thursday, April 24, 2014

Witch's Hat: National Poetry Month 24 of 30

Witch's Hat


When we were young,
how did we survive?
It's just quite a wonder,
we're all still alive.

We didn't wear helmets.
We didn't wear pads.
We just jumped on our bikes,
our parents were glad.

We climbed up the slides,
and stood upon swings,
jumped off seesaws,
patched a few stings.

We played on equipment,
unsafe for us all:
like the witch's hat,
and monkey bars much too tall.

In water too shallow,
we dove in the pool.
We jumped off high dives
as tall as our school.

It's really a wonder,
we all lived through it.
If I could do it again,
I gladly would do it.


© Cathy L. Mere 2014


I'd planned to write about a slide today, but somehow I started thinking about the old witch's hat on our school playground.  We used to gather on that piece of equipment and push from side to side.  At some point they quit letting us put our feet in the middle and soon we weren't allowed to ride it.  My friends and I would go to the school in the evening and play on the witch's hat.  We'd stand on it, pushing back and forth until the hat banged against the metal pole in the middle.  I'm sure that wasn't safe….which inspired this. 

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.





Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Swing: National Poetry Month 23 of 30

via WikiMedia Commons by Stilfehler
Swing

Nothing
on a playground shouts freedom
like a swing.

Waiting
to soar 
into the light blue sky.

Reaching
beyond the playground
above the school.

Flying
into the air
among the trees.

Gliding 
with birds
in effortless flight.

Nothing
on a playground shouts freedom
like a swing.

Cathy L. Mere  2014


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.


Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Chalk: National Poetry Month 22 of 30

Chalk

Colorful lines
cover black pavement
bringing smiles
to faces.

What if chalk
had magic?

What if I could
draw a picture
that would come to life;
bring out the sun,
or design a plane
to take me on far away adventures?

What if I could
step inside
the world I made
to discover secrets untold?

What if I could
write my wish,
any wish,
and it would come true?

© Cathy L. Mere 2014



I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," then "objects I just can't live without" and "school objects."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found on the playground.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Today is the Tuesday Slice of Life Challenge.  Stop by Two Writing Teachers for many great links.  





Monday, April 21, 2014

Math Tools: National Poetry Month 21 of 30

Math Tools

Stack them,
Count them,
Place in tens.
Put them together,
Then count again.

Squares,
Circles,
Cubed shaped too.
Line them up,
It's fun to do.

Sort them,
Group them,
Count them all.
Numbers big,
and numbers small.

Add,
Subtract,
To solve a problem.
Math tools help,
They're really awesome.

Link them,
Join them,
Make a line.
With friends or alone
They work just fine.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014





I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me




Sunday, April 20, 2014

The Band-Aid®: National Poetry Month 20 of 30

The Band-Aid®

The paper left a slice
and it didn't feel so nice,
get a band-aid.

You have a little cut
and the gash it will not shut,
get a band-aid.

As you sat, you picked a scab
and it's really hurting bad,
get a band-aid.

That hangnail hurts a lot,
you need protection for that spot,
get a bandaid.

Much better you will feel,
though it might not help it heal.
Yes, the bandaid.

It hurts and makes you cry,
but this will dry your eyes.
Yes, the bandaid.

It works almost every time
and in relief we all do chime.
Yes, the bandaid.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014



If you've been to a first grade classroom,  you know there's nothing that fixes things like a band-aid.  


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Paper: National Poetry Month 19 of 30

Paper

White,
blank,
waiting
for small hands
to fill it with color,
creating,
sharing,
covering the space
once silent,
whispering stories,
memories,
notes
across the paper.
Bringing the world
to the page,
the page
to the world.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me



Friday, April 18, 2014

Color My World: National Poetry Month 18 of 30

via wikimedia commons Jimmy Joe
Color My World

I have a pack of crayons,
a pack of just twenty four.
They've always been all I needed.
There wasn't a need for more.

I could color a yellow orange sun,
a tree of deepest green,
or maybe a small blue pond,
my pictures a colorful scene.

One day I discovered a big pack,
with colors so vivid and bright.
I knew I just had to have it,
to color a world just right.

Imagine what I could color,
with crayons like Caribbean green,
or purple mountain's majesty,
unmellow yellow could brighten the scene.

Of course a giant box of 120,
will give me color galore.
There's fuzzy wuzzy brown,
macaroni and cheese, and more.

Crayola® has all the colors
to make my picture sing,
as color jumps from the page
the joy crayons can bring.

©  Cathy L. Mere





It's Poetry Friday!  Today's round up is being hosted by Robyn Hood Black at Life on the Deckle Edge.  Stop by more great poetry links!

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  




Thursday, April 17, 2014

Spork: National Poetry Month 17 of 30

Spork

via Photobucket by Brandie 876
No knife.
No fork.
No spoon.
Just spork.
Glorious spork.
To eat
green beans,
salad,
applesauce,
and soup,
one must become
skilled
at the art
of sporking
food
in the school
cafeteria.

©  Cathy L.  Mere  2014


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

National Poetry Month 16 of 30: The Red Pen

Kindergarten.
Red pen
over the first letter of my name.
The C
now a red K.
This teacher
had no idea who I was.

High School.
Red pen
over my stories,
my thoughts,
my dreams.
Stifling my voice,
making me silent.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

National Poetry Month 15 of 30: Book Baskets

Book Baskets

Stories
rest here.
Books
waiting to be picked,
chosen to be held,
read with delight,
talked about among friends,
taken home.
Baskets of red,
blue,
yellow,
rest
upon the shelves.
Waiting
to be carried
to a quiet place.
Waiting
to carry readers
       to places
            beyond.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

We're still just fresh out of the Slice of Life Challenge so we're back to posting every Tuesday.  Thanks to Two Writing Teachers for hosting and inspiring us.  Stop by to read today's stories.


Scott is starting a Tune 4 Tuesday.  I love the way he weaves a story with a song.  I'm learning a lot about music along the way and decided to give it a try.  

In honor of school poems, I thought I'd share this blast from the past.  Enjoy!  




Monday, April 14, 2014

National Poetry Month 14 of 30: With Apologies to the Sonnet (a little tax humor)

with apologies to the sonnet

for months i dread the days we two will share
but still they come upon me just the same
in days of waiting i try not to care
yet i know we must play this awful game

the April days stretch on and fly right by
and soon i myself can no longer wait
before the moment escapes i must try
the burden of the task the greatest weight

finally we sit down to hash it out
you kindly share with me your knowledge deep
as we search for common ground i want to shout
these days for you i'd climb a mountain steep

now we go our separate ways, say goodbye
until April returns with heavy sigh

© Cathy L. Mere 2014





Tax season has once again come and gone.  I wouldn't have survived without TurboTax.  So I wrote this little sonnet --- ok I attempted a sonnet-like poem --- to share this love/hate relationship I have with Turbo Tax.  A little poetry fun this evening as I consider objects I just can't live without (nothing personal, but I wish I could live without this one!).  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.




Sunday, April 13, 2014

National Poetry Month 13 of 30: Sky Walking

This morning I wandered over to Mary Lee's blog where she is writing about the wonders of the world each day.  Today's poem was about the Golden Gate Bridge.  This object has connected two places since 1937.  Our family visited the bridge several years ago.  It just takes your breath away.

When I read Mary Lee's poem, I thought I'd give one a try in her comments.  I thought I was going to write about the beauty of the bridge when you see it or maybe the way it connects two worlds.  Yet, as I researched a bit, my attention kept returning to the men.  Why did those men choose to do such dangerous work?  I thought about Eve Bunting's book, Pop's Bridge.  Then I found this PBS page about The Men Who Build the Bridge and I read about the "halfway to hell club" and it's 19 members who survived a fall from the bridge thanks to the special safety net so I tried this….

Photograph via Golden Gate Bridge
Sky Walking

I try not to look down
at the rushing saltwater below.
It's harder to climb now
that I fight the memory;
the memory of climbing,
holding onto cables,
of placing my feet firmly
against the steel.

But it was foggy that day,
and hard to see;
the steel slippery like ice.
I worked against
the wind
as it tried to grab me.
A sudden gust
caught me off guard,
my feet, not firmly planted,
failed me.
I reached,
my hand unable to grasp.

My mind raced
as I tumbled
head over heel,
heel over head.
It was a second
and an hour
all at the same time.
I thought about my family,
my wife begged me
not to take this job,
but we needed the money,
our children needed to eat.

Suddenly I felt something
breaking my fall.
I hit hard,
but crisscrossed arms
surrounded me.
The net.
The beautiful net
saved my life.

I've been "halfway to hell"
yet still I climb
everyday
and pray.
Trying not to notice
the saltwater
rushing
below.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

National Poetry Month 12 of 30: Remote Control

Remote Control

I wait quietly alone.
Isolated.
Lonesome.
As he enters
the living room
I hear him
asking for me,
searching,
until he finds me
resting on the table,
tucked inside the couch,
waiting on an armrest,
or abandoned near the tv.
He smiles,
wraps his hands
around me,
sits down
in his big fluffy recliner,
puts his feet up,
pushes my buttons.
Evenings together
are my daily delight.


© Cathy L. Mere 2014



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Friday, April 11, 2014

National Poetry Month 11 of 30: Dear Coffeepot

The Hamilton Beach 2 Way Brewer
Seriously, love this coffeepot.
It can brew one cup or
an entire pot.
Dear Coffeepot

Dear Coffeepot, I thank you
for being there for me.
Each morning I lumber to you
though I can barely see.

My eyes are still half closed;
my brain is still asleep.
Absentmindedly I reach for coffee
and place it in a heap.

I press your silver buttons;
you start to do your thing.
You get the morning moving,
you whir, you hum, you sing.

You take the water given
and turn it deep dark brown.
The smell soon fills my kitchen;
my brain soon comes around.

Whether a cup is needed
or the day requires much more.
You're always there for me, Dear Pot,
It's you, I do adore.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014






April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

I was a little late to post to Poetry Friday this week, but you should still stop by as it is hosted my Michelle at Today's Little Ditty.  


Thursday, April 10, 2014

National Poetry Month 10 of 30: Magic Wand

Magic Wand

If you've got curls
that won't be tamed,
just look around
and call my name.

Just plug me in
and we'll be set.
A curl my match,
I haven't met.

Just pull me through
your crazy hair.
Give me a try
if you dare.

Say goodbye
to curls and wave.
Your wild hair
I can save.

Say goodbye
to fluff and frizz.
Fixing hair
is just my biz.

So plug me in,
crank up the heat.
The end result
just can't be beat.

© Cathy L. Mere




April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.






Wednesday, April 9, 2014

National Poetry Month 9 of 30: Keyless Magic

Keyless Magic

Magic.
No need
to dig,
search,
wrestle,
rummage,
for keys.
The keyless fob:
a wonder.


© Cathy L. Mere



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Tuesday, April 8, 2014

National Poetry Month 8 of 30: Who Knew?

This may be my current
favorite song on my iPhone.
Who Knew?

If you would have told me
all those years ago
as I played my album
on the white turn table
of the portable record player
I got as a gift,
I wouldn't have believed you.

If you would have told me
as we drove around
in our cars,
driver's license new,
listening to the cassettes
of songs recorded
from the radio,
I would've laughed.

If you would have told me
that someday I would
hold all of my music
right in my hand,
though there was a stack
of albums
in my bedroom
too heavy to carry,
I would have thought
you just might be crazy.

If you would have told me
today
I'd carry a device
smaller than my hand
everywhere.
A box holding 3, 415
of my favorite songs,
spanning from 1955
to now,
a variety of artists and genres,
I would've said it couldn't be so.

Yet, here I am
my music device
isn't just my music device,
it's my calendar,
my communication,
my books,
my entertainment,
my pulse to the world.
Who would have guessed?


© Cathy L. Mere








Every time I hold my iPod in my hand I'm still fascinated by the idea that all the music I love is right in my hand.  Who would've guessed I could have my old music, my new music, and my favorite collections all in one place.  Today I'm joining Scott's Tune 4 Tuesday, National Poetry Month, and a Slice of Life.  You see, this evolution is a story - a story of a gift.  It's also a poem - a poem of an object I couldn't live without (well, at least I hope I never have to live without).  It's a celebration of song.  

So for the today, I thought I'd find out a little about my iPod.  I couldn't believe how much music I have.  It would take a long time to listen to all of it.  I also wondered what was the most played song on my iPod.  Honesty, I was a little surprised to see this was the #1 most played songs on my iPod: One Republic, Apologize.  I would tell you my top 10, but then you might know too much about me.  **wink wink**

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

We're still just fresh out of the Slice of Life Challenge so we're back to posting every Tuesday.  Thanks to Two Writing Teachers for hosting and inspiring us.  Stop by to read today's stories.


Scott is starting a Tune 4 Tuesday.  I love the way he weaves a story with a song.  I'm learning a lot about music along the way and decided to give it a try.  



Monday, April 7, 2014

National Poetry Month 7 of 30: Stories Rest Inside

Stories Rest Inside

In our basements,
in boxes,
tucked in drawers,
live memories.

the stringless violin
in its broken case,
the metal thimbles
wrapped carefully,
ticket stubs
from evenings faded.

objects kept
not because of need,
items saved
for their story.

the infant hat
will not be worn again,
the slide projector
never played,
the quilt too fragile
now rests
on a high shelf.

the stories
rest deep inside,
almost forgotten,
until stumbled upon
in an accidental discovery,
a moment of memory,
held again
for a quick second
in our heart.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

During the first week of the challenge, I found myself writing about objects of memory.  We all keep things around our homes that are kept strictly because they hold a story.  They remind us of someone or something or some time we don't want to forget.  I've tried to capture a few of those stories here in poems.  In the next week, I'm hoping to focus on objects I just can't live without.  Hmmmm, I wonder what I'll discover. 

Take a moment to check out the links in the sidebar for other great poetry stops.  




Sunday, April 6, 2014

National Poetry Month 6 of 30: Whatchamacallit Box

The Whatchamacallit Box

The whatchamacallit box
hangs on our mantle high,
with different color knobs
and doors that you can try.

Opening up and down,
opening side by side,
with so many tiny compartments
there's lots that you can hide.

Open the door slowly,
peek carefully inside.
Which door to open first
is something to decide.

What is the box of wood
that hangs above the stove?
A peek inside uncovers
a secret treasure trove.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Today's poem was inspired by a box my grandfather made years ago for my parents.  We had recently moved into our new house with its unusual shape.  I'm sure this inspired my grandfather's craftsmanship.  He came in one day carrying his new piece of "art" and screwed it into the mantle.  

Take a moment to check out the links in the sidebar for other great poetry stops.  


Saturday, April 5, 2014

National Poetry Month: Skating Advice 5 of 30

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm going to join other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Today's poem was inspired by a conversation about rollerblading….and the day I wiped my dad out skating because I couldn't stop.  Sorry, Dad.  My friends are trying to get me to put my skates back on, but there are some things I should remember first.  


Skating Advice
Before you put your blades on,
before you tie the shoe,
and start to skate away,
there are things that you should do.

Tie your laces tightly.
Don't forget your pads.
You must protect yourself
in case things do go bad.

While skating you will glide.
While skating you will soar.
back and forth on curves,
the breeze you will adore.

Right foot over left,
and left foot over right.
You know that you can do it
so try with all your might.

But most of all remember,
before you start to skate.
Make sure you practice stopping
before it is too late!

Friday, April 4, 2014

National Poetry Month 4 of 30: Building

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm going to join other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Today is my son, John's, birthday.  This week's poems have been focused on "objects of memory."  You know the things we keep around our house more because there's a story attached to them than because they are of any use to us.  Legos are exactly one of those things.

Happy birthday, John.


Building
Years ago
you'd spend hours
building
one Lego brick to another,
detailed instruction sheets
open on the floor,
each piece
snapping to another
making it bigger,
better.

Now the legos
tucked safely away,
red,
yellow,
green,
blue,
wait patiently
to be played with again.

For you,
those days
are long gone.
Now
you're busy
taking classes,
studying,
reading,
working hard.

Now
you build
bigger things.
Now
you're busy
building a life.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

Thursday, April 3, 2014

National Poetry Month 3 of 30:

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm going to join other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Unicycle
Getting used to one wheel
was not the hardest thing.
There's steering without handlebars,
without a bar to cling.

One must keep her balance
work hard to not fall down,
the faster you can manage
the more you move around.

It takes a lot of practice,
but soon you too will see,
that one wheel's all that's needed,
on that we can agree.

Doing tricks with one wheel only, 
forward and back you go
ride across thin ramps
put on a special show.  

While bicycles have two wheels
a unicycle needs just one.
Once you get your balance
it really can be fun.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014







Wednesday, April 2, 2014

National Poetry Month 2 of 30: Witness

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm going to join other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

This week:  objects of memory

Witness

Every day
the wooden ring
rested on her lap
she sewed and stitched
stitched and sewed.

As she worked
the circle frame
pulled the pieced fabric
of clothing outgrown,
clothing worn out.

Across the years
I sat beside her
as she joined
our stories,
quilt after quilt.

I watched her,
the round frame
resting on her lap,
she sewed and talked,
sewed and listened.

Now the worn circle
stands against the wall
a quiet witness
to the time we spent
together.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014






Tuesday, April 1, 2014

National Poetry Month 1 of 30: Violin

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm going to join other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  

My purpose is threefold:
  1. To provide poem mentors for my students.
  2. To move myself away from my love of nature poems to try writing about something different.
  3. To improve my photo taking on my phone.
If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.


Violin
This violin 
now rests 
in my basement,
tucked 
in a closet,
on top 
of boxes,
where it sits 
alone.

I've never 
played.
Never 
wanted 
to play,
Yet
I couldn't 
let the violin 
go.

The violin
used to hang, years ago,
in my grandfather's basement,
above the cement floor,
near his work bench,
close to the tools 
which occupied 
his hands.

He often told 
the story of years of lessons:
the required discipline,
the endless practice, 
his voice told me he didn't love this time,
but it was still somehow significant
in ways he didn't understand then,
but perhaps had come to understand, 
as is often the case,
in the years that followed.  
Though its strings are missing,
it still plays music.
It whispers lyrics
of stories from long ago
of days with
grandpa.



© Cathy L. Mere, 2014

Slice of Life: March Discoveries

Yesterday was the last day of the Slice of Life Challenge so today we are back to posting every Tuesday.  Thanks to Two Writing Teachers for hosting and inspiring us.  


In January I chose my One Little Word to be DISCOVER.  As the first three months have passed, I'm not so sure it's about discovering so much as taking time to do things, to pay attention.  March has been a good month for finding time to discover.

March was full of DISCOVERIES
Great Places


New Recipes

New Books


A New Fantasy Season

And dessert.  Lots of DESSERT!


My One Little Word:  Discover




Poetry Month: The Last Poem 30 of 30

For the month of April, I'll be writing poetry each day in celebration of National Poetry Month.  I've decided not choose a theme, n...