Sunday, April 26, 2015

Poetry Month: Chocolate Crisis 26 of 30



I looked inside the freezer
and on the pantry shelf,
for just a piece of chocolate
to eat all by myself.

There weren't any Reese's,
no chocolate anywhere.
I looked high and low.
Then looked here and there.

Just one piece of chocolate
is all I want to find.
I've searched in all my hiding spots.
I'll surely lose my mind.

No chocolate behind the coffee pot.
None hidden in the drawer.
Not tucked beside the books.
There has to be some more.

There's not a piece to be found.
I'm really just so blue.
How will I survive without chocolate?
What's a girl to do?

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Friday, April 24, 2015

Poetry Month: Night Song 24 of 30

Today our first graders spent some time with poet, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, discussing poetry.  OH.  MY.  GOODNESS.  During our Skype call Amy shared the different points of view she sometimes uses to write poetry.  She shared the story of the small creature she watched racing in and out of a wall.  She talked about the many ways she could write about that.  One way she shared was by writing AS the creature (or other animal/object/etc.).  She called this a MASK poem.  After our time with her, we talked about the ways we might write our poetry.  I was telling a student about the coyotes I hear each night in the field behind our house.  I decided, after Amy's conversation, to write a poem as the coyote for Poetry Friday.  

Image:  Rebecca Richardson (2008)
via WikiMedia Commons
NIGHT SONG
When the sun
is replaced
by the night sky,
     I call.

When the moon
rises, faintly lighting
the earth below,
     I call.

When the stars look
down upon the world
gently twinkling,
     I call.

In the dark night
others join
the chorus;
     I call.

While others rest,
     I roam.
While others sleep,
     I hunt.
While others hide,
     I seek.
In the silence,
     I call.

You hear me,
     howling deep into the night.

© Cathy L. Mere



Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


It's Poetry Friday!  Stop by No Water River where Renée LaTulippe hosts today's parade of wondrous words.









Thursday, April 23, 2015

Poetry Month: I Regret 23 of 30

i regret

not making exercise
healthier foods
part of my routine

worrying about a clean house
when my grandparents
called to visit

never slowing down
enough to enjoy moments
that slipped through my fingertips

not sitting down to listen
every time my children
told me a story

not organizing the pictures
that captured the moments
we shared

letting the busyness of life
keep me from staying connected
with my very best friends

putting "to do"
before to enjoy
to help, to love

not taking chances
because i thought
i just couldn't

i regret everything

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

I really don't regret everything, but yet there are always those things that nag us a bit.  On quiet, contemplative days, regret is an easy thing to think about.  Life moves quickly.  It's hard to keep up with it's pace and demand.  I'm always envious of those who seem to sail their ships through calm waters with the sun shining day after day.  The other day, I stumbled upon this article interview with Toni Morrison, 'I Regret Everything': Toni Morrison Looks Back on Her Personal Life.  I was intrigued so I clicked to read.  I think we all sometimes can get caught up in regret.  In the interview Morrison said, writing provides "big protection" from her thoughts.  "I regret everything" seemed like it had poem potential.


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Poetry Month: In the Gloaming 22 of 30


In the Gloaming

The place
where charcoal clouds
resting upon a blue-black backdrop
coalesce;
blushing clouds 
resting upon a cerulean canvas.
The line
where day meets night -
twilight.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015





It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Poetry Month : Noticing 21 of 30

what if you no longer notice?

after how many years
do you fail to notice
the deepness of spring green;
the way the flowers parade,
crocus to daffodils,
hyacinths to tulips,
bud to leaf?

what happens
on the morning
you no longer
note the iridescence of the sky
as the sun ascends,
celebrate the chorus of birds
outside your window,
smile over the smell
of coffee brewing?

how many times
do you drive down a road
before you stop
paying attention
to the faces of those
who race past you
on the endless road
rushing from
here to there?

how many billboards
do you pass
before you stop reading,
stop caring
about what you might need,
where you should stop;
ignoring the messages
as they race by in a blur?

how many stories
do you hear
before you stop listening,
stop believing the words,
no longer wondering
what happened
or might happen next,
no longer feeling
the heaviness?

what does it mean
if you no longer notice?

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015



Today's Slice of Life
Today's poem was inspired as I was waiting in line at the local convenient store where I had stopped for a loaf of bread (and maybe a Dr. Pepper on crushed ice).  A woman entered the store, and stopped in front of the counter carefully considering the candy.  She spent much time staring at the chocolate bars, flavored candies, and sugary treats.  Finally choosing a candy bar, she got into the line to pay.

Honesty, I have been ignoring this candy for years.  There are so many choices I find it overwhelming.  With rows and rows of candy on display you start to ignore the tempting treats as you pay to exit.  It made me think about how many things are always around us.  Between the material items on display everywhere go, the amount of information sent our way, and the volume of people, cars, and houses we see everyday, perhaps we begin to filter it all out.  Does our desire to filter the unnecessary make us less likely to notice the important things around us?  What happens when we no longer notice?  


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's also Tuesday so I'm joining the Slice of Life Challenge hosted by Two Writing Teachers.  



Monday, April 20, 2015

Poetry Month: Clever Parrot 20 of 30

Image via WikiMedia Commonsby Snowman Radio
Clever Parrot

When I told my mom I wanted a parrot
     she said, "There's just no way."
When I brought it home to live with me,
     she said, "It cannot stay!"

But stay it did, for quite some time,
     as days turned into weeks,
My mom's patience began to wane
     as screams came from its beak.

The screams could not be hushed
     the shrieks they were so shrill.
My mom she grew quite agitated,
     she wanted him to chill.

I convinced her a friend was all,
     my pet parrot really did need.
We added another bird to the cage,
     and gave them fresh water and seed.

"Polly wants a cracker,"
     would have been nice to hear them say.
Instead they repeated words they shouldn't,
     and words that weren't okay.

I tried to teach them manners,
     I tried to make them kind.
Those parrots just kept making noise,
     I couldn't make them mind.

They bit and were so messy,
     their cage was such a wreck.
When upset with life in general,
     the parrots they would peck.

Then one night it happened,
     our house it caught on fire.
The parrots knew just what to do,
     we are grateful for what transpired.

The parrots yelled, "Fire!  Fire!"
     "Help! Fire!" from inside they screamed.
The crew pushed through the front door,
     fire fighters raced to the scene.

My mom says those crazy parrots,
     did just what they needed to do.
She's just so proud I had to ask,
     "How about another two?"
   

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015




I guess you can get ideas anywhere.  You might have heard the story about the fire in Idaho in which the firefighters raced into the house as they heard cries for help.  They expected to find people inside to rescue, but parrots were making all of that noise.  I began to wonder about those parrots.  What kind of pets were they?  How did they learn to talk?  How did they know to yell for help?  What was their story?

A few sites that provided insight into the parrot as a pet:
National Geographic:  Parrot 
Bird Channel:  Ten Facts About Living with Parrots
In Defense of Animals:  The Truth About Parrots
About Home:  Good Words and Phrases to Teach Your Parrot


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Poetry Month: Goodbye, Dear Weekend 19 of 30

Monday rests on the other side of night.
The weekend now a distant light.
Gone are friends and family fun.
Gone are days that blend to one.
Where sunshine feels bright and bold.
Where moments put our breath on hold.
Days where laughter filled our heart.
Days which now, we each must part.

The curtain closes on the stage this time.
No time for encore; the bell does chime.
The clock strikes midnight; the cuckoo sings.
The days have passed, we try to cling.
The rain pours quickly from the sky.
The dark clouds feel our deepest cry.
The weekend's gone, to be no more.
We must move on, must close the door.

But, oh, the fun we two did share.
Those days we didn't have a care.
Mondays will come and they will go;
The week will surely go too slow.
Hopefully again we two shall meet;
Myself and weekend soft and sweet.
Until that time we meet again;
I'll think of you and smile within.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

So....there are poems we write that probably shouldn't be published, but here we go anyway.  I mean, after all, when you are writing a poem each day sometimes you just have to let one go.  Today I was thinking about the busy weekend we had, and all the fun times within it.  We were able to spend time with friends, family, and still get a some work done in our flowerbeds.  Oh, Weekend, I do love thee.  I decided to try to write a goodbye to the weekend, and set my sights on an elegy.  Yes, we could argue whether I accomplished the elegy or even the parody, but maybe you'll humor me a bit on this, the 19th, day of poetry writing.


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar.