Friday, April 18, 2014

Color My World: National Poetry Month 18 of 30

via wikimedia commons Jimmy Joe
Color My World

I have a pack of crayons,
a pack of just twenty four.
They've always been all I needed.
There wasn't a need for more.

I could color a yellow orange sun,
a tree of deepest green,
or maybe a small blue pond,
my pictures a colorful scene.

One day I discovered a big pack,
with colors so vivid and bright.
I knew I just had to have it,
to color a world just right.

Imagine what I could color,
with crayons like Caribbean green,
or purple mountain's majesty,
unmellow yellow could brighten the scene.

Of course a giant box of 120,
will give me color galore.
There's fuzzy wuzzy brown,
macaroni and cheese, and more.

Crayola® has all the colors
to make my picture sing,
as color jumps from the page
the joy crayons can bring.

©  Cathy L. Mere





It's Poetry Friday!  Today's round up is being hosted by Robyn Hood Black at Life on the Deckle Edge.  Stop by more great poetry links!

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  




Thursday, April 17, 2014

Spork: National Poetry Month 17 of 30

Spork

via Photobucket by Brandie 876
No knife.
No fork.
No spoon.
Just spork.
Glorious spork.
To eat
green beans,
salad,
applesauce,
and soup,
one must become
skilled
at the art
of sporking
food
in the school
cafeteria.

©  Cathy L.  Mere  2014


I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Wednesday, April 16, 2014

National Poetry Month 16 of 30: The Red Pen

Kindergarten.
Red pen
over the first letter of my name.
The C
now a red K.
This teacher
had no idea who I was.

High School.
Red pen
over my stories,
my thoughts,
my dreams.
Stifling my voice,
making me silent.

© Cathy L. Mere 2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

Tuesday, April 15, 2014

National Poetry Month 15 of 30: Book Baskets

Book Baskets

Stories
rest here.
Books
waiting to be picked,
chosen to be held,
read with delight,
talked about among friends,
taken home.
Baskets of red,
blue,
yellow,
rest
upon the shelves.
Waiting
to be carried
to a quiet place.
Waiting
to carry readers
       to places
            beyond.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014

I'm writing poetry for 30 days.  For the first seven days of the challenge I wrote about "objects of memory," and then I wrote about "objects I just can't live without."  For the next seven days I will be writing about objects that can be found at school.  This will help me to prepare for a little poetry writing with students.  Our class will be taking poetry around the building in the days to come.  


April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.  

We're still just fresh out of the Slice of Life Challenge so we're back to posting every Tuesday.  Thanks to Two Writing Teachers for hosting and inspiring us.  Stop by to read today's stories.


Scott is starting a Tune 4 Tuesday.  I love the way he weaves a story with a song.  I'm learning a lot about music along the way and decided to give it a try.  

In honor of school poems, I thought I'd share this blast from the past.  Enjoy!  




Monday, April 14, 2014

National Poetry Month 14 of 30: With Apologies to the Sonnet (a little tax humor)

with apologies to the sonnet

for months i dread the days we two will share
but still they come upon me just the same
in days of waiting i try not to care
yet i know we must play this awful game

the April days stretch on and fly right by
and soon i myself can no longer wait
before the moment escapes i must try
the burden of the task the greatest weight

finally we sit down to hash it out
you kindly share with me your knowledge deep
as we search for common ground i want to shout
these days for you i'd climb a mountain steep

now we go our separate ways, say goodbye
until April returns with heavy sigh

© Cathy L. Mere 2014





Tax season has once again come and gone.  I wouldn't have survived without TurboTax.  So I wrote this little sonnet --- ok I attempted a sonnet-like poem --- to share this love/hate relationship I have with Turbo Tax.  A little poetry fun this evening as I consider objects I just can't live without (nothing personal, but I wish I could live without this one!).  

April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.




Sunday, April 13, 2014

National Poetry Month 13 of 30: Sky Walking

This morning I wandered over to Mary Lee's blog where she is writing about the wonders of the world each day.  Today's poem was about the Golden Gate Bridge.  This object has connected two places since 1937.  Our family visited the bridge several years ago.  It just takes your breath away.

When I read Mary Lee's poem, I thought I'd give one a try in her comments.  I thought I was going to write about the beauty of the bridge when you see it or maybe the way it connects two worlds.  Yet, as I researched a bit, my attention kept returning to the men.  Why did those men choose to do such dangerous work?  I thought about Eve Bunting's book, Pop's Bridge.  Then I found this PBS page about The Men Who Build the Bridge and I read about the "halfway to hell club" and it's 19 members who survived a fall from the bridge thanks to the special safety net so I tried this….

Photograph via Golden Gate Bridge
Sky Walking

I try not to look down
at the rushing saltwater below.
It's harder to climb now
that I fight the memory;
the memory of climbing,
holding onto cables,
of placing my feet firmly
against the steel.

But it was foggy that day,
and hard to see;
the steel slippery like ice.
I worked against
the wind
as it tried to grab me.
A sudden gust
caught me off guard,
my feet, not firmly planted,
failed me.
I reached,
my hand unable to grasp.

My mind raced
as I tumbled
head over heel,
heel over head.
It was a second
and an hour
all at the same time.
I thought about my family,
my wife begged me
not to take this job,
but we needed the money,
our children needed to eat.

Suddenly I felt something
breaking my fall.
I hit hard,
but crisscrossed arms
surrounded me.
The net.
The beautiful net
saved my life.

I've been "halfway to hell"
yet still I climb
everyday
and pray.
Trying not to notice
the saltwater
rushing
below.

© Cathy L. Mere  2014



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.

Saturday, April 12, 2014

National Poetry Month 12 of 30: Remote Control

Remote Control

I wait quietly alone.
Isolated.
Lonesome.
As he enters
the living room
I hear him
asking for me,
searching,
until he finds me
resting on the table,
tucked inside the couch,
waiting on an armrest,
or abandoned near the tv.
He smiles,
wraps his hands
around me,
sits down
in his big fluffy recliner,
puts his feet up,
pushes my buttons.
Evenings together
are my daily delight.


© Cathy L. Mere 2014



April is National Poetry Month.  Again this year, inspired by Mary Lee Hahn, I'm joining other poetry bloggers (view links in sidebar) taking the challenge to share poetry each day during the month of April.  For thirty days my hope is to write a new poem each day.  The first two years I took this challenge I wrote any poem that found me.  This year, however, I've decided to try to write a poem about an object each day.  If you've read Billy Collins' poem, The Lanyard, you may have noticed the way he took an object to tell a much more meaningful story of his relationship with his mother.  My hope is to find the deeper significance in the things around me.