Thursday, April 30, 2015

Poetry Month: Summer Guest 30 of 30

I thought you weren't coming this year,
but today I spotted you,
soaring beneath the sky
wings outstretched
circling above the roof
before descending
into the chimney.

You must be busy in there
building your nest,
cementing sticks to the brick walls,
knowing soon
babies will come.
This nest will keep you safe
through summer.

Chimney swift,
I will watch you
as you sail through the sky
at sunset
searching for insects:
bees, mosquitoes, flies,
for your evening snack.

I will watch
as you glide in the sky above
gracefully swooping
for hours as the sun crosses
from east to west.
You are happy to have returned
to your summer home.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


Each year, as spring moves toward summer, our chimney is visited by swifts looking for a summer home.  I'm not a big fan of having birds sharing our home, but it is something I have grown used to in the years since we have moved here.  Our house was built some time ago, and without a metal cover on our chimney, swifts love to set up a home.  I'm used to the cycle.  Every year I think they aren't coming and then one day I hear it, the furious flapping of wings and the chitter chatter of nighttime conversations.   Apparently, they are on the decline due to loss of habitat.  Perhaps we are doing our part for the ecosystem by tolerating their preference for nesting in our chimney.  

It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Poetry Month: For the Love of Baseball 28 of 30



Game day
I can still hear Grandma
pacing in the kitchen
as she washes the plates clean
after the last innings
of dinner.

The Big Red Machine
on the radio,
Marty and Joe banter
sharing the play by play.
She listens
talking back to the radio.
The box blares
static between statements,
but she still catches every word.

My sweet
mild mannered grandma
who feeds the birds,
makes us pancakes,
takes us on picnics,
and smiles when
we slide home from the creek
covered in mud,

My loving grandma
isn't so mild mannered
when Johnny Bench
isn't moving fast enough,
when Pete Rose
isn't hitting,
when Griffey misses
a fly ball.

She isn't going to be happy
until she hears them say,
"and this one
belongs to the Reds."

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

This week the Reds honored the 1990 World Championship team and the notorious Nasty Boys with a celebration.  The rain delay probably gave the celebration more coverage than it would have received. As I watched the celebration, I remembered my grandma and her love of the Reds.  She cheered on the 1990 team, but I will always think of her as a fan of the Big Red Machine.  We would stay with her for a week each summer, and on game night she'd be in the kitchen pacing and yelling calls to the Reds.  Sometimes I was sure she should replace Sparky Anderson.  She loved the game.


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's also Tuesday so I'm joining the Slice of Life Challenge hosted by Two Writing Teachers.  

Monday, April 27, 2015

Poetry Month: Rooted 27 of 30

The tree stands
where it always stood,
watching,
knowing.

It has always been there
providing shade,
lifting its branches
in warm hello.

Its solid trunk
stands tall
helping the tree see
what others cannot.

The dependable tree
waits quietly,
listens,
comforts.

In life's busyness
the tree's forgotten,
leaves fall,
seeds sow.

Time passes,
days
turn to weeks,
weeks to years.

Finally I step outside
where the tree
stands tall,
ever loyal.

The tree awaits,
leaves greener than I remember,
holding my stories,
my comfortable friend.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Sunday, April 26, 2015

Poetry Month: Chocolate Crisis 26 of 30



I looked inside the freezer
and on the pantry shelf,
for just a piece of chocolate
to eat all by myself.

There weren't any Reese's,
no chocolate anywhere.
I looked high and low.
Then looked here and there.

Just one piece of chocolate
is all I want to find.
I've searched in all my hiding spots.
I'll surely lose my mind.

No chocolate behind the coffee pot.
None hidden in the drawer.
Not tucked beside the books.
There has to be some more.

There's not a piece to be found.
I'm really just so blue.
How will I survive without chocolate?
What's a girl to do?

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Friday, April 24, 2015

Poetry Month: Night Song 24 of 30

Today our first graders spent some time with poet, Amy Ludwig VanDerwater, discussing poetry.  OH.  MY.  GOODNESS.  During our Skype call Amy shared the different points of view she sometimes uses to write poetry.  She shared the story of the small creature she watched racing in and out of a wall.  She talked about the many ways she could write about that.  One way she shared was by writing AS the creature (or other animal/object/etc.).  She called this a MASK poem.  After our time with her, we talked about the ways we might write our poetry.  I was telling a student about the coyotes I hear each night in the field behind our house.  I decided, after Amy's conversation, to write a poem as the coyote for Poetry Friday.  

Image:  Rebecca Richardson (2008)
via WikiMedia Commons
NIGHT SONG
When the sun
is replaced
by the night sky,
     I call.

When the moon
rises, faintly lighting
the earth below,
     I call.

When the stars look
down upon the world
gently twinkling,
     I call.

In the dark night
others join
the chorus;
     I call.

While others rest,
     I roam.
While others sleep,
     I hunt.
While others hide,
     I seek.
In the silence,
     I call.

You hear me,
     howling deep into the night.

© Cathy L. Mere



Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


It's Poetry Friday!  Stop by No Water River where Renée LaTulippe hosts today's parade of wondrous words.









Thursday, April 23, 2015

Poetry Month: I Regret 23 of 30

i regret

not making exercise
healthier foods
part of my routine

worrying about a clean house
when my grandparents
called to visit

never slowing down
enough to enjoy moments
that slipped through my fingertips

not sitting down to listen
every time my children
told me a story

not organizing the pictures
that captured the moments
we shared

letting the busyness of life
keep me from staying connected
with my very best friends

putting "to do"
before to enjoy
to help, to love

not taking chances
because i thought
i just couldn't

i regret everything

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

I really don't regret everything, but yet there are always those things that nag us a bit.  On quiet, contemplative days, regret is an easy thing to think about.  Life moves quickly.  It's hard to keep up with it's pace and demand.  I'm always envious of those who seem to sail their ships through calm waters with the sun shining day after day.  The other day, I stumbled upon this article interview with Toni Morrison, 'I Regret Everything': Toni Morrison Looks Back on Her Personal Life.  I was intrigued so I clicked to read.  I think we all sometimes can get caught up in regret.  In the interview Morrison said, writing provides "big protection" from her thoughts.  "I regret everything" seemed like it had poem potential.


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Poetry Month: In the Gloaming 22 of 30


In the Gloaming

The place
where charcoal clouds
resting upon a blue-black backdrop
coalesce;
blushing clouds 
resting upon a cerulean canvas.
The line
where day meets night -
twilight.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015





It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Tuesday, April 21, 2015

Poetry Month : Noticing 21 of 30

what if you no longer notice?

after how many years
do you fail to notice
the deepness of spring green;
the way the flowers parade,
crocus to daffodils,
hyacinths to tulips,
bud to leaf?

what happens
on the morning
you no longer
note the iridescence of the sky
as the sun ascends,
celebrate the chorus of birds
outside your window,
smile over the smell
of coffee brewing?

how many times
do you drive down a road
before you stop
paying attention
to the faces of those
who race past you
on the endless road
rushing from
here to there?

how many billboards
do you pass
before you stop reading,
stop caring
about what you might need,
where you should stop;
ignoring the messages
as they race by in a blur?

how many stories
do you hear
before you stop listening,
stop believing the words,
no longer wondering
what happened
or might happen next,
no longer feeling
the heaviness?

what does it mean
if you no longer notice?

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015



Today's Slice of Life
Today's poem was inspired as I was waiting in line at the local convenient store where I had stopped for a loaf of bread (and maybe a Dr. Pepper on crushed ice).  A woman entered the store, and stopped in front of the counter carefully considering the candy.  She spent much time staring at the chocolate bars, flavored candies, and sugary treats.  Finally choosing a candy bar, she got into the line to pay.

Honesty, I have been ignoring this candy for years.  There are so many choices I find it overwhelming.  With rows and rows of candy on display you start to ignore the tempting treats as you pay to exit.  It made me think about how many things are always around us.  Between the material items on display everywhere go, the amount of information sent our way, and the volume of people, cars, and houses we see everyday, perhaps we begin to filter it all out.  Does our desire to filter the unnecessary make us less likely to notice the important things around us?  What happens when we no longer notice?  


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's also Tuesday so I'm joining the Slice of Life Challenge hosted by Two Writing Teachers.  



Monday, April 20, 2015

Poetry Month: Clever Parrot 20 of 30

Image via WikiMedia Commonsby Snowman Radio
Clever Parrot

When I told my mom I wanted a parrot
     she said, "There's just no way."
When I brought it home to live with me,
     she said, "It cannot stay!"

But stay it did, for quite some time,
     as days turned into weeks,
My mom's patience began to wane
     as screams came from its beak.

The screams could not be hushed
     the shrieks they were so shrill.
My mom she grew quite agitated,
     she wanted him to chill.

I convinced her a friend was all,
     my pet parrot really did need.
We added another bird to the cage,
     and gave them fresh water and seed.

"Polly wants a cracker,"
     would have been nice to hear them say.
Instead they repeated words they shouldn't,
     and words that weren't okay.

I tried to teach them manners,
     I tried to make them kind.
Those parrots just kept making noise,
     I couldn't make them mind.

They bit and were so messy,
     their cage was such a wreck.
When upset with life in general,
     the parrots they would peck.

Then one night it happened,
     our house it caught on fire.
The parrots knew just what to do,
     we are grateful for what transpired.

The parrots yelled, "Fire!  Fire!"
     "Help! Fire!" from inside they screamed.
The crew pushed through the front door,
     fire fighters raced to the scene.

My mom says those crazy parrots,
     did just what they needed to do.
She's just so proud I had to ask,
     "How about another two?"
   

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015




I guess you can get ideas anywhere.  You might have heard the story about the fire in Idaho in which the firefighters raced into the house as they heard cries for help.  They expected to find people inside to rescue, but parrots were making all of that noise.  I began to wonder about those parrots.  What kind of pets were they?  How did they learn to talk?  How did they know to yell for help?  What was their story?

A few sites that provided insight into the parrot as a pet:
National Geographic:  Parrot 
Bird Channel:  Ten Facts About Living with Parrots
In Defense of Animals:  The Truth About Parrots
About Home:  Good Words and Phrases to Teach Your Parrot


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Poetry Month: Goodbye, Dear Weekend 19 of 30

Monday rests on the other side of night.
The weekend now a distant light.
Gone are friends and family fun.
Gone are days that blend to one.
Where sunshine feels bright and bold.
Where moments put our breath on hold.
Days where laughter filled our heart.
Days which now, we each must part.

The curtain closes on the stage this time.
No time for encore; the bell does chime.
The clock strikes midnight; the cuckoo sings.
The days have passed, we try to cling.
The rain pours quickly from the sky.
The dark clouds feel our deepest cry.
The weekend's gone, to be no more.
We must move on, must close the door.

But, oh, the fun we two did share.
Those days we didn't have a care.
Mondays will come and they will go;
The week will surely go too slow.
Hopefully again we two shall meet;
Myself and weekend soft and sweet.
Until that time we meet again;
I'll think of you and smile within.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

So....there are poems we write that probably shouldn't be published, but here we go anyway.  I mean, after all, when you are writing a poem each day sometimes you just have to let one go.  Today I was thinking about the busy weekend we had, and all the fun times within it.  We were able to spend time with friends, family, and still get a some work done in our flowerbeds.  Oh, Weekend, I do love thee.  I decided to try to write a goodbye to the weekend, and set my sights on an elegy.  Yes, we could argue whether I accomplished the elegy or even the parody, but maybe you'll humor me a bit on this, the 19th, day of poetry writing.


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


Friday, April 17, 2015

Poetry Month: Hyacinths 17 of 30



Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's Poetry Friday!  Stop by Robyn Hood Black's space, Life on the Deckled Edge, where she hosts today's parade of wondrous words.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Slicing Poetry: Determined 14 of 30

Today was our first day of our after school poetry writing class.  We have nearly sixty students staying to read and write poetry with us.  We started by dividing into smaller groups and writing poems about the playground.  The students loved playing with words, searching for meaning, and finding rhythms.  

Tonight, I thought I'd write a little poem about the playground.  I'm always amazed by the students that work for days, sometimes weeks, to learn to cross the rings.  Day after day they return to try again until they finally make it across the silver rings.  


Shared Poetry Writing
Image by Carolyn Carr
Bravely
each day,
she eyes the rings,
taking a leap,
working to cross.

Determined
she swings,
each silver ring
seeming farther
than the last.

Courageously
she returns
day after day,
swinging harder,
gripping tightly.

Persisting
she tries
and tries again,
learning tricks,
building strength.

Undaunted
she swings
from ring to ring,
until finally
she makes it.

© Cathy L. Mere


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's also Tuesday so I'm joining the Slice of Life Challenge hosted by Two Writing Teachers.  

Monday, April 13, 2015

Poetry Month Nothing is Different 13 of 30

Light Will Come One Day by Mozamell Hossain Shahdom
via WikiMedia Commons
Nothing is different
in darkness;
the trees are still green,
the grass still bends
in the wind.

Nothing is different
in darkness;
the cats still prowl
the birds still rest
in their nests.

Nothing is different
in darkness;
you can still sit at the table,
the door still opens
into the world.

Though it may seem
harder to find the way,
look up at the stars,
light your candle,
you can find
your way.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 




Sunday, April 12, 2015

Poetry Month: empty spaces 12 of 30

walking
through the quiet house
into rooms
once filled with laughter
now only silence 
lives there

Cathy L. Mere, 2015


It's April and National Poetry Month.  I'm writing a poem every day to help celebrate!  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Saturday, April 11, 2015

Poetry Month: Ladybug 11 of 30

Image via WikiMedia Commons
by Gilles San Martin 2009
Children love you for your color,
your red and orange bright wings,
the black spots upon your back,
the fact that you don't sting.

You are the star of children's books,
always kind and always true,
your gentle ways they note,
make others happy through and through.

Farmers love you too,
for the way you love to eat,
you keep their crops quite healthy.
with aphids a favorite treat.

I must confess the truth
to my readers stopping by,
I'm not your biggest fan
hoping away you soon do fly.

You leave the fields behind us,
for a place that's safe and warm.
cuddle up in tiny spaces,
stay safe from winter storms.

When I try to toss you out,
you play dead and laugh at me,
your friends come soon to join you
oh how happy you must be.

Unlike the fly who's life span
is hardly thirty days,
you live for two or three years
and never go away!

Ladybug do me a favor
make the field your home,
this house will never be big enough
for both of us to roam.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015




Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Friday, April 10, 2015

Poetry Month: Dear Duck 10 of 30

Oh, dear duck
from the sky you see,
the body of water
that calls to thee.

But, oh, dear duck,
do not be faked.
It's not a pond,
for goodness sake.

It's not a lake.
It's not a creek.
It's not the home
that you now seek.

Though the water's
calm and still;
you won't find food
to fill your bill.

Don't come here
to make a nest
or lay your eggs
or take a rest.

But please stop by
to play and float,
to take a bath
or clean your coat.

Oh, dear duck,
you must still roam
find a better place
to be your home.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


We have quite a pond in our backyard.  Days and days of rain have made this a favorite stop for ducks passing through.  Some years we have had ducks decide to stay only to find their beautiful pond quickly goes away.  

Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

It's Poetry Friday!  Stop by Laura Purdie Salas's space where she hosts today's parade of wondrous words.




Thursday, April 9, 2015

Poetry Month: Morning Marvel 9 of 30



this morning's surprise,
opening toward the sky:
tiny daffodils.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015



Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

Poetry Month: We Have to Ask 8 of 30

What if 
questions 
were more important than 
answers;
learning 
was more essential than 
testing?  

What if 
love 
got more attention than 
hate;
the heart
was celebrated more than 
the head?  

What if
listening
was more common
than talking;
empathy
more prevalent than
indifference?

What if
kindness
was more revered than
selfishness;
tolerance
more universal than
prejudice?

What if 
slowing down
mattered more than 
hurrying;
following dreams 
was something everyone
did?  

What if 
failing
really didn't matter,
instead
it helped you to grow?

What if
it wasn't the destination we
pursued,
but the journey;
our yesterdays
not as significant as
today.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 



Tuesday, April 7, 2015

Poetry Month: Never-ending 7 of 30



The basketballs
still bounce
when the batters
start to swing.

There is no break
in sports
to let you
slow down things.

The catchers
still catch
when the quarterback
starts to throw.

A sportsman
dream come true,
he'll happily
tell you so.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015


Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 







Monday, April 6, 2015

Poetry Month: What Can You Hear in Silence? 6 of 30



Only in the quiet
can you hear
the bubbling of the fish tank;
the clicking of the dog's feet
across the hardwood floor.

Only in the quiet
can you hear
the rumble of the truck;
the hum of electricity
racing from darkness to light.

Only in the quiet
can you hear
the reflections of the day;
the memories
of times cherished.

Only in the quiet
can you hear
your true voice;
the stories and words
that fill your soul.

@Cathy L. Mere, 2015

Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


Sunday, April 5, 2015

Poetry Month: The Awakening 5 of 30




Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 


Saturday, April 4, 2015

Poetry Month: The Blink of an Eye 4 of 30

Today is my son's birthday.  I'm not sure how I have children so old all of a sudden.  It seems I blinked and their childhoods had raced right by.  Happy birthday, John.  

I remember when
you army crawled
across the living room floor.
When my biggest concern
was that you would
steal the pacifier
of an infant
passing by.

I remember when
you fixed everything
in our house
with plastic tools.
When my biggest concern
was which story
we would read
before bed.

I remember when
you raced around
the soccer field
chasing the soccer ball
as if it was magnetic.
When my biggest concern
was that you could
hear us cheering
you on from the sidelines.

I remember when
your friends carried
small televisions
into our house.
Cords made paths
from player to player
in an intense challenge
of skill.
When my biggest concern
was having enough
food for your friends.

I remember when
toy cars were replaced
with real cars.
You'd get behind the wheel
pull out of the driveway
to go here and there.
When my biggest concern
was you arriving home
safely.

I'm not sure when
you became taller
than me,
or when the games
you play
became real life.
When my biggest concern
was that your world
be filled with the happiness
you have given me.

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015

Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Friday, April 3, 2015

Poetry Month: Spring Peeper 3 of 30

photo Lisa Rainsong
find out more about Spring Peepers
on her blog:  Listening in Nature
In darkness
you serenade;
your friends 
join
the symphony.

The melody
grows, 
vibrating across
fields 
now turning green.

While an X
marks your back,
you cannot be found
as you hide
like treasure.

Camouflaged 
in dead leaves,
rotting logs,
you sing your song
long into the night.

Your friends 
join you,
the chorus 
an ever-rising 
crescendo. 

© Cathy L. Mere, 2015



It's Poetry Friday!  Stop by The Poem Farm where Amy Ludwig VanDerwater hosts today's parade of wondrous words.

This month I will be writing a poem each day to celebrate National Poetry Month.  Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Poetry Month: Coffee 2 of 30



Thanks to Margaret SimonLeigh Anne EckMichelle HaseltineLinda BaieJulieanne Harmatz, and Kevin Hodgson for giving the final push.  We are linking using the hashtag #digipoetry.  I have to also thank my everyday poetry mentors Mary Lee Hahn & Amy Ludwig Vanderwater.  They continually inspire me.  You'll find more poetry on the sidebar. 

Poetry Month: The Last Poem 30 of 30

For the month of April, I'll be writing poetry each day in celebration of National Poetry Month.  I've decided not choose a theme, n...